Specifications Manual for Joint Commission National Quality Measures (v2021A1)
Posted: 9/25/2020
Home » Reason for No Bisoprolol, Carvedilol, or Sustained-Release Metoprolol Prescribed for LVSD in the Outpatient Setting

Release Notes:
Data Element
Version 2021A1

Name:Reason for No Bisoprolol, Carvedilol, or Sustained-Release Metoprolol Prescribed for LVSD in the Outpatient Setting
Collected For: ACHFOP-01
Definition:Reasons for not prescribing bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate for LVSD in the outpatient setting:

  • Beta-blocker allergy
  • Second or third-degree heart block on ECG and does not have a pacemaker
  • Other reasons documented by physician/advanced practice nurse/physician assistant (physician/APN/PA) or pharmacist

Bisoprolol, carvedilol, and sustained-release metoprolol succinate are agents which block beta-adrenergic receptors, thereby decreasing the rate and force of heart contractions, and reducing blood pressure. Over time beta-blockers improve the heart's pumping ability.
Question:Is there documentation of a reason for not prescribing bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate for LVSD in the outpatient setting?
Format:
Length:1
Type:Alphanumeric
Occurs:1
Allowable Values:

Y (Yes) There is documentation of a reason for not prescribing bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate for LVSD in the outpatient setting.

N (No) There is no documentation of a reason for not prescribing bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate for LVSD in the outpatient setting, or unable to determine from medical record documentation.

Notes for Abstraction:
  • A beta-blocker “allergy” or “sensitivity” documented counts as an allergy regardless of what type of reaction might be noted (e.g., “Allergies: Beta-blockers — Impotence” — select “Yes”).
  • Documentation of an allergy/sensitivity to one particular beta-blocker is acceptable to take as an allergy to the entire class of beta-blockers (e.g., “Allergic to Toprol-XL”).
  • When conflicting information is documented in a medical record, select “Yes”.
  • When determining whether there is second or third-degree heart block on ECG in the outpatient setting AND does not have pacemaker:
    • Consider this true if (1) there are findings of second or third-degree heart block on the ECG AND this same ECG does NOT show pacemaker findings, OR (2) There is documentation of a finding of second or third-degree heart block (not specifically referenced as an ECG finding) without mention of the presence of pacemaker findings (e.g., “Second-degree heart block” per ER report).
    • Disregard pacemaker findings if documentation suggests the patient has a non-functioning pacemaker.
    • Second or third-degree heart block and pacemaker ECG findings can be taken from unsigned ECG reports. Physician/APN/PA documentation is not required.
    • Second or third-degree heart block findings and pacemaker findings from telemetry and rhythm strips are acceptable.
    • In cases where ECG findings of second- or third-degree heart block are referenced and documentation does not address the presence or absence of pacemaker findings, infer no pacemaker findings. E.g., “ECG on arrival showed second-degree heart block” per H&P.
  • When determining whether there is a reason documented by a physician/APN/PA or pharmacist for not prescribing bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate in the outpatient setting:
    • Reasons must be explicitly documented (e.g., “COPD - No BBs”, “HR running in 50s. Hold off on beta-blocker therapy”) or clearly implied (e.g., “Severe hypotension with beta-blockers in past,” “BBs contraindicated,” “Pt. refusing all medications,” “Supportive care only — no medications,” “BBs not indicated,” beta-blocker on pre-printed order form is crossed out, “No beta-blockers” [no reason given]). If reasons are not mentioned in the context of beta-blockers, do not make inferences (e.g., Do not assume that bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate is not being prescribed because of the patient's history of Peripheral Vascular Disease alone).
      • Discontinuation of bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate documented in combination with the start of a another one of these beta-blockers (i.e., switch from bisoprolol to carvedilol) does not count as a reason for not prescribing bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate in the outpatient setting. Examples:
        • “Stop carvedilol” and “Start Coreg 12.5 mg po bid” in same physician order
        • “Change metoprolol to Coreg” in progress note
      • Discontinuation of bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate at a particular dose documented in combination with the start of a different dose of that beta-blocker (i.e., change in dosage) does not count as a reason for not prescribing bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate in the outpatient setting. Examples:
        • “Stop metoprolol succinate 25 mg po” and “Start metoprolol succinate 50 mg po” in same physician order
        • “Increase bisoprolol 5 mg to 10 mg” in progress note
    • “Reason documentation which refers to a more general medication class is not acceptable (e.g., “Hold all BP meds”).
    • Deferral from one physician/APN/PA or pharmacist to another does NOT count as a reason for not prescribing bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate in the outpatient setting unless the problem underlying the deferral is also noted. Examples:
      • “Consulting cardiologist to evaluate pt. for beta-blocker treatment” - select “No”.
      • “Pt. hypotensive. Start Coreg if OK with cardiology.” - select "Yes”.
    • If there is documentation of a plan to initiate/restart bisoprolol, carvedilol, or sustained-release metoprolol succinate, and the reason/problem underlying the delay in starting/restarting the beta-blocker is also noted, this constitutes a “clearly implied” reason for not prescribing a beta-blocker in the outpatient setting.
      • Acceptable examples (select “Yes”):
        • “BPs running low. May start Zebeta as outpatient.”
        • "Add Toprol-XL if HR stabilizes"
      • Unacceptable examples (select “No”):
        • “Consider starting Coreg next appointment .”
        • “May add beta-blockers when pt. can tolerate”
Suggested Data Sources:
  • Consultation notes
  • Emergency department record
  • History and physical
  • Progress notes
  • Physician orders
  • Discharge summary
  • Transfer sheet
  • Outpatient medical record
Additional Notes:
Guidelines for Abstraction:
Inclusion Exclusion
2nd/3rd degree heart block (HB) Note: The following inclusive terms may stand alone or be modified by “variable” or “intermittent.”
  • Atrioventricular (AV) block described as 2 to 1, 3 to 1, second-degree, or third-degree
  • Atrioventicular (AV) dissociation
  • Heart block (HB) described as 2 to 1, 3 to 1, complete (CHB), high degree, high grade, second-degree, or third-degree
  • Mobitz Type 1 or 2
  • Wenckebach

Pacemaker findings
  • Paced rhythm
  • Paced spikes
  • Pacing described as atrial, AV, dual chamber, or ventricular

Beta-blocker allergy

  • Allergy to beta-blocker eye drops (e.g., Cosopt)
  • Beta-blocker allergy described using one of the negative modifiers or qualifiers listed in Appendix H, Table 2.6, Qualifiers and Modifiers Table

2nd/3rd degree heart block (HB)

  • 2nd/3rd degree heart block (HB), or any of the other 2nd/3rd degree heart block inclusion terms, described using one of the negative modifiers or qualifiers listed in Appendix H, Table 2.6, Qualifiers and Modifiers Table
  • Atrial flutter
  • Atrioventricular (AV) block or conduction block, type/degree not specified
  • First-degree atrioventricular (AV) block
  • First-degree heart block (HB)
  • Heart block, type/degree not specified
  • Intraventricular conduction delay (IVCD)

Reason for No Bisoprolol, Carvedilol, or Sustained-Release Metoprolol Prescribed for LVSD in the Outpatient Setting
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Specifications Manual for Joint Commission National Quality Measures (v2021A1)
Discharges 01-01-21 (1Q21) through 06-30-21 (2Q21)

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